Course Overview

Adaptation is now at the forefront of architectural practice; two of the most pressing challenges in the 21st century are climate change and urbanisation. Given that already more than half of the global population live in urban environments, and by 2050, it is projected that over 70% of the world population will live in cities, all societies need to be able to accommodate growth while at the same time, reducing consumption. The existing building stock needs to become both more efficient and more resilient. 

Students will investigate the four main aspects of sustainable reuse - environmental, societal, inhabitation and economic – while also exploring heritage, history, memory, community, and the influence these factors have on remodelling activities. They will look at the impact that context and the environment have upon projects, while developing an understanding of some of the technical issues including construction, environmental control, and materials in order to make creative and appropriate proposals for new users of buildings. Students will also examine specific examples of adaptive reuse, theories of reuse and explore strategies for the conservation and adaptation of the existing environment.­­

The specialist workshops within Manchester School of Art and the University of Manchester will provide students with opportunities to explore materiality, fabrication, and the realisation of ideas. Studio teaching is research-informed and underpinned by design research methodologies and engagement with industry.

Features

  • Shape the future of the built environment by exploring new, heritage friendly and sustainable approaches to development.
  • RIBA award-winning buildings provide high-quality facilities and learning environments.
  • Benefit from building, industry and workshop visits alongside collaborative projects with students, clients and users.
  • Study a degree that is delivered jointly by The University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University. You will benefit from the facilities and resources of both institutions such as libraries, computer suites, making and media workshops and much more. Upon successful completion of your studies, you will receive one degree certificate. The joint award certificate includes each institution’s crest and awarding body title.

Career Prospects

Graduates of Architecture and Adaptive Reuse will be well-equipped to enter a variety of roles within architecture, planning, conservation, and heritage management across both academic and industry contexts.

Duration

1 year full-time
2 years part-time

Teaching and Learning

Students of Architecture and Adaptive Reuse will be introduced to a variety of key research methodologies that directly inform their practice, whilst developing a deeper understanding of architecture and reuse. A dissertation project provides an opportunity for students to explore a research topic that directly relates to their personal interests, whilst design and investigation units will challenge students to apply analytical skills alongside creative design thinking.

Research 1: Methods

Research 1: Methods

Methods is an opportunity for students to explore techniques and processes that inform design as a spatial practice. The research methods unit introduces techniques that directly inform design as a spatial practice.

Research 1 and Research 2 encourage students to develop the subject of their enquiry in dissertations in parallel with their interests, career aspirations and the content of studio units. The subject chosen will reflect the symbiosis between design practice and theory, and allow for scholarship within individual specialisms to be placed within a deeper understanding of architecture as a whole.

Research 2: Dissertation

Research 2: Dissertation

This unit provides an opportunity for students to explore a research topic that may relate to their personal interests in design through the media of an extended piece of disciplined academic writing (8000 – 12000 words).

Research 1 and Research 2 encourage students to develop the subject of their enquiry in dissertations in parallel with their interests, career aspirations and the content of studio units. The subject chosen will reflect the symbiosis between design practice and theory, and allow for scholarship within individual specialisms to be placed within a deeper understanding of architecture as a whole.

Adaptive Reuse Investigation

Adaptive Reuse Investigation

Within this unit, students will carry out in-depth investigations into a specific site, situation or building. They will be expected to examine and analyse the particular characteristics of the chosen site. This will normally include research into the structure, materials, organisation, character, occupants and context of the building, plus an exploration of the immediate context and an examination of things further away.

Adaptive Reuse Concepts

Adaptive Reuse Concepts

This unit will introduce the key principles and issues surrounding adaptive reuse, which may include sustainable design, heritage, conservation, materials, policy and planning, interiors and urbanism, and more. Learning will take place via lectures, seminars, and workshops, culminating in a report that captures this exploration of the field and will allow students to define their specialist areas of interest for use in future units.

Adaptive Reuse Design

Adaptive Reuse Design

In this design thesis project, underpinned by research-informed teaching, students will be encouraged to critically engage with the development of a programme in real-world settings that reflect contemporary discourse in academic and professional practice. From this, the student will establish an intellectual position within the field of Architecture and Adaptive Reuse, and employ applied, creative design thinking to challenging problems.

Programme Leader

Sally Stone
Sally Stone Reader in Architecture and Adaptive Reuse View profile